Thursday, April 21, 2011

Dream big poets!

A wicked bit of satire from the Onion. We can all have a group cry now.

"CINCINNATI—Shortly before her reading Tuesday at local bookstore Word Mentality, author Francine Massey told reporters that she does her absolute best for everyone who comes out to see her, whether it's just three people or a much larger crowd of nine people..."

Read the entire article here.

Monday, April 18, 2011

Manitoba Book Award Winners


Palimpsest Press congratulates Ariel Gordon who has WON the Aqua Books Lansdowne Poetry Prize for Hump.

Here are the judges' comments:

"Hump is Ariel Gordon's first book, coming on the heels of a variety of magazine publications and two chapbooks. The focus of Hump is the rich experience of motherhood and marriage on the one hand, and of city life in the integrated context of the natural world, which is everywhere engaging, fierce, beautiful, and unstoppable. This is capable, exuberant writing, at once passionate and meticulous. Hump is a worthy first book indeed."

—Aqua Books Lansdowne Prize for Poetry / Le Prix Lansdowne du poesie jury, composed of Michael Harris, Kenneth Meadwell, and Serge Patrice Thibodeau.

Friday, April 15, 2011

MAGPIE BOOKS


Palimpsest Press has previously published two picture books, The Naming Book of Rascally Rhymes and Eanie Meanie Hate Zucchini. We intend to continue publishing picture books while expanding into juvenile and young adult fiction with our new imprint Magpie Books.

The first book to be published under the Magpie imprint will be a picture book entitled Oscar, written by Jordan Troutt and Sarah Preston. Oscar is a curious cat who must travel to the moon in order to get milk. In anapestic rhyming couplets, the narrative is fun, lively, and easy enough for young children to follow along. The second book is The Haunting of Amos Manor by Richard Stevenson. “An Old House With Possibilities,” the Real Estate advertisement had read, meaning, one supposed, a fixer-upper. For the Waldmans that would be half the pleasure... except that things start to go wrong from the moment they move in. Karen is having strange dreams and someone keeps moving things. Then there is the strange crow that keeps appearing and disappearing. Do ghosts really exist? Fourteen-year-old Mark Waldman is determined to find out. Join Mark as he solicits the help of his family, and, yes, even the assistance of his nerdy sister, in uncovering the mystery. Some things never die or stay hidden for long.

The website is now on-line http://www.magpiebooks.ca/

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Upcoming Readings

Ariel Gordon will be reading from Hump April 14th at the Manitoba Book Awards nominee reading. It will be at Aqua Books in Winnipeg at 7pm.

Ariel will also be at a benefit reading May 7th at 866 Rue St. Joseph. Dinner at 7 and readings at 8. Jake MacDonald will also be reading. Admission $65. A charitable tax receipt will be issued for a portion of the ticket price. Rainbow and silent auction to follow. Tickets available at Aqua Books, McNally Robinson, and Prairie Fire.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Good Holding Ground Book Launch

Cynthia Woodman Kerkham will be reading from her debut poetry collection Good Holding Ground at

PLANET EARTH POETRY
at The Moka House, #103-1633 Hillside Avenue,
Victoria, B.C. V8T 2C4.
(250) 370-2077
FRIDAY April 29th 7:30 P.M.
$3 at the door.

Friday, April 1, 2011

Gunmetal Blue: A Memoir

SOON TO BE RELEASED —


Gunmetal Blue is an investigation of how to be in the world—how to be a doctor, how to be a poet, and how to be both. Tempered with memoir and populated with poetic case studies, Neilson learns about himself as his patients reveal their frailties. Medicine might be considered the more productive activity by society, but Neilson found poetry in every office visit. Taught to research clinical questions, he took this scientific practice and made it a literary one: how can a doctor better know his patients, and how does this translate into self-knowledge? Poetry and medicine are topics intertwined since the time of the Greeks and, in this case, the connection between the two literally becomes his lifeline.